Bauhaus Online | Magazin http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin en-US Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung introduces new corporate design http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-introduces-new-corpora <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With this revision of elements forming its corporate design, the <a href="http://www.bauhaus.de">Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung in Berlin</a> is further consolidating its strategic orientation as the world’s leading collecting and research insti- tution for the Bauhaus and the history of the design school’s influence. The Bauhaus-Archiv conducts research and presents the history and influence of the Bauhaus (1919–1933), the 20th century’s most impor- tant school of architecture, design and art. The website <a href="http://www.bauhaus.de">www.bauhaus.de</a> will be launched today, featuring a new design and expanded content.</p><p>"With our new design, we have rendered the transformation in our institution outwardly visible and tangible", declared the director of the Bauhaus-Archiv, Dr Annemarie Jaeggi. "Our visitor numbers and the collection’s holdings are constantly growing. In 2019, to mark the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus, we will be adding a new Bauhaus-Museum building on our grounds. Along with historical Bauhaus themes, we have increasingly begun to pursue the question of the degree to which the Bauhaus influences and inspires our lives today. This dichotomy is magnificently displayed by the newly created house typeface 'bayer next', the newly designed Internet portal bauhaus.de and our unmistakable printed materials. It is therefore a very special pleasure for me to be able to publicly present the sense of anticipation to be found within our institution by means of our new self-presentation."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-introduces-new-corpora" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/bha-glyphen_01_300dpi_01.jpg" alt="" title="Derivation of the glyphs Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin " class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="285" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-introduces-new-corpora"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The new overall design developed by Professor Sascha Lobe and his team at the Stuttgart agency L2M3 Kommunikationsdesign GmbH, encompasses not only the stationery and other printed materials of the Bauhaus-Archiv, but also numerous other materials applying this design, such as exhibition catalogues and the semi-annual programme magazine. The design of the museum’s website was also fundamentally revised by L2M3. The new information and control system in the interior and exterior areas of the Bau- haus-Archiv will be installed in the coming months. In mid July 2014, a poster campaign in the Berlin met- ropolitan area will already be launched in cooperation with the Wall AG and will present the new image of the Bauhaus-Archiv to the inhabitants of and visitors to the capital city of Berlin. </p><p><strong>The “bauhaus-archiv” word mark, which was developed by the Bauhaus master <a href="/en/atlas/personen/herbert-bayer" title="Herbert Bayer">Herbert Bayer</a>, was taken up by the creative agency and carefully supplemented.</strong> </p><p>"Our intention was to stir memories of the Bauhaus legacy and to make use of already available resources for the self-presentation of the Bauhaus-Archiv. We thus developed a concept that communicates the essence of the Bauhaus and, through its technical and aesthetic innovations, is simultaneously suited for a cultural institution’s self-presentation in a manner that is up to date and effective in terms of publicity", explained head designer Professor Sascha Lobe. "A globally active institution like the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung requires internationally comprehensible and effective instruments of communica- tion, which we have developed within the framework of a unified, but simultaneously flexible system."</p><p><strong>"Archive of glyph forms"</strong></p><p>Along with the revised word mark "Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung", the system developed by L2M3 for the Bauhaus-Archiv encompasses an extensive set of characters featuring the new house type- face "bayer next" and glyphs taken from historical Bauhaus texts. In this way, unlimited possibilities have been created for adapting the design’s application in printed materials and digital media. In the words of Professor Sascha Lobe: "We paid homage to the diversity of the archival material by redrawing the glyphs and examining further possibilities for their adaptation and modification – we have created a total of over 500 characters and gathered them together in an 'archive of glyph forms'."</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-introduces-new-corpora#comments Berlin Design Mon, 21 Jul 2014 19:10:40 +0000 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin 8671 at http://bauhaus-online.de Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung launches Berlin poster campaign http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-launches-berlin-poster <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Beginning immediately, they can be seen on posters all across Berlin: <a href="/en/atlas/personen/marcel-breuer" title="Marcel Breuer">Marcel Breuer</a>’s world-famous tubular steel chair, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/marianne-brandt" title="Marianne Brandt">Marianne Brandt</a>’s tea infuser, photographs of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a>’s "Triadic Ballet" and the distinctive building of the Bauhaus-Archiv – a late work by Bauhaus founder <a href="/en/atlas/personen/walter-gropius" title="Walter Gropius">Walter Gropius</a>. These exceptional works are all part of the "Bauhaus Collection: Classic Modern Originals" at the <a href="http://www.bauhaus.de">Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung</a>, and they can be seen at the Klingelhöferstraße 14. The Berlin poster campaign featuring the four motifs was made possible through the generous support of the Wall AG. For one week at the beginning of August, the motifs from the Bauhaus Collection will also be shown on the digital advertising panels in the underground station at Friedrichstraße. </p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-launches-berlin-poster" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/plakatmotive_bauhaus-archiv_berlin_cl2m3.jpg" alt="" title="New posters for the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin " class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="150" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-launches-berlin-poster"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"In our poster campaign, we place four individuals from the Bauhaus in the spotlight as pioneers of modern design", explains Dr Annemarie Jaeggi, Director of the Bauhaus-Archiv. "Innovative teaching methods and the collaboration with important figures from highly diverse fields enabled Bauhaus students to develop their talents early on and to follow new paths. You can explore the results in our permanent exhibition."</p><p>The poster campaign that can be seen for the next 14 days was made possible by the generous support of Wall AG. Daniel Wall, Chairman of the Board of Wall AG, has stated: "Even today, the Bauhaus continues to have a strong influence on art and architecture. With the Bauhaus-Archiv, Berlin possesses a genuine cultural gem that has fascinated its many visitors. For us as well – as street furnishers and outdoor advertisers – aesthetics and appealing design are important values. That is why we are particularly pleased to support the Bauhaus-Archiv in inspiring even more people with enthusiasm for the beauty of the forms of modern and timeless design."</p><p><strong>The Bauhaus figures in the poster campaign</strong></p><p>In 1919, the 35-year-old architect Walter Gropius founded the Bauhaus, which became the 20th century’s internationally most important school of architecture, design and art. Gropius is considered one of the main protagonists of modern architecture. In 1979 the distinctive building that he designed for the Bauhaus-Archiv was opened in Berlin as a central site for the heritage of the Bauhaus. His estate provided the initial foundation of the Bauhaus collection in Berlin.<br /> As the only woman, Marianne Brandt taught in the metal workshop of the Bauhaus Dessau in the 1920s and created timeless design classics, such as her tea infuser, which continues to be manufactured today. </p><p>The architect and designer Marcel Breuer is seen as the inventor of modern tubular steel furniture. He designed the renowned tubular steel armchair B 3 in 1926, one year after being appointed a junior master and the head of the furniture workshop at the Bauhaus Dessau.<br /> The artist Oskar Schlemmer described his "Triadic Ballet", which was also performed on the Bauhaus stage, as a "festival in form and colour". Numerous original photographs, including those of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/erich-consemueller" title="Erich Consemüller">Erich Consemüller</a>, have been preserved. </p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-archiv-museum-fuer-gestaltung-launches-berlin-poster#comments Berlin Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:51:09 +0000 Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung in Berlin 8670 at http://bauhaus-online.de Wassily Kandinsky – Teaching at the Bauhaus http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/wassily-kandinsky-teaching-at-the-bauhaus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The teaching work of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky" title="Wassily Kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky</a> (1866–1944) at the Bauhaus is the focus of an exhibition that can be seen at the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung from 25 June to 8 September 2014. Kandinsky, the pioneer of abstract painting, taught at the famous art school for 11 years, up to its closure in <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1933" title="1933">1933</a>. Teaching manuscripts and materials by the Bauhaus teacher, on loan from the archives of the Centre Pompidou (Paris) and the Getty Research Institute (Los Angeles), are being presented together for the first time, along with a selection of practical exercises and notes made by his students from the holdings of the <a href="http://www.bauhaus.de">Bauhaus-Archiv in Berlin</a> and the <a href="http://www.bauhaus-dessau.de">Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau</a>. The combination of these materials at the "Wassily Kandinsky – Teaching at the Bauhaus" exhibition reveals the content and methods that Kandinsky used for teaching in the Mural Painting Workshop, in the Basic and Main Courses, and in the Free Painting Class at the Bauhaus, and the exhibition also illustrates the ways in which the students used and reflected on them. </p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/wassily-kandinsky-teaching-at-the-bauhaus" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/11_ausstellungsplakat_kandinsky_2014_l2m3.jpg" alt="" title="Exhibition poster &quot;Wassily Kandinsky – Teaching at the Bauhaus&quot; Bauhaus-Archiv design: L2M3" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="309" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/wassily-kandinsky-teaching-at-the-bauhaus"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"None of the other Bauhaus masters worked at the Bauhaus for as long as Wassily Kandinsky did. His teaching work and his charismatic personality had an enormous influence on the students," explains Dr. Annemarie Jaeggi, Director of the Bauhaus-Archiv.</p><p>During his time at the Bauhaus, Wassily Kandinsky developed his ideas on the theory of art further, teaching them and putting them into practice. His publications and eleven of his prints and watercolours from this period of his creative work are also on show. In addition, works dedicated to him by of his Bauhaus colleagues – one each by <a href="/en/atlas/personen/laszlo-moholy-nagy" title="László Moholy-Nagy">László Moholy-Nagy</a>, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/georg-muche" title="Georg Muche">Georg Muche</a>, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/lyonel-feininger" title="Lyonel Feininger">Lyonel Feininger</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Paul Klee</a> – are also being exhibited.</p><p>The exhibition "Wassily Kandinsky – Teaching at the Bauhaus" is based on a research project carried out by the Société Kandinsky and is curated by art historian Dr. Angelika Weißbach. It is accompanied by a 195-page catalogue with some 200 illustrations, edited by Bauhaus researcher Prof. Magdalena Droste on behalf of the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung. A varied programme of events provides further information about details from the exhibition.</p><p><strong>Exhibits</strong></p><p>Twenty pages of text and notes by Wassily Kandinsky from his course preparation work, as well as 30 items of pictorial material and seven publications that he presented as teaching materials; 60 exercises, works and notes made by students (including Eugen Batz, Erich Comeriner, Lothar Lang, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/hans-thiemann" title="Hans Thiemann">Hans Thiemann</a> and Monica Ulmann-Broner), five publications and 11 works (watercolours, prints) by Vassily Kandinsky and one art work each by László Moholy-Nagy, Georg Muche, Lyonel Feininger and Paul Klee.</p><p><strong>Exhibition catalogue</strong></p><p>Wassily Kandinsky – Teaching at the Bauhaus, ed. by Magdalena Droste for the Bauhaus-Archiv, Berlin. 2014, museum catalogue (self-published), 195 pages with a total of approx. 200 illustrations, available in German and English at the Bauhaus-Archiv for €29 or by mail order from the Bauhaus shop for €33 (<a href="http://www.bauhaus-shop.de">www.bauhaus-shop.de</a>). </p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/wassily-kandinsky-teaching-at-the-bauhaus#comments Bauhaus Faces Berlin Exhibition Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:44:27 +0000 Dina Blauhorn 8669 at http://bauhaus-online.de Bauhaus Face: Ida Kerkovius http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-ida-kerkovius <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ida Kerkovius was born on 31 August 1879 in Riga, one of twelve children of an affluent, respectable German family. She attended a secondary school for young ladies and was taught to play the piano and sing. Her parents indulged her desire to be an artist and sent her to a private art school in Riga, where she completed a foundation course. When she visited an art salon in Riga in 1901 – an exhibition of works by Baltic German women artists – Kerkovius was impressed by the work of the painter and pupil of Adolf Hölzel, Martha Hellmann. Following a tour of Italy a few months later, Ida Kerkovius visited Hölzel in Dachau and likewise became his pupil. After five formative months – working under Hölzel, the young woman learned that painting was an autonomous means of expression and that the picture has to be built up from colour – she was called home by her parents. Five years passed before she returned to Germany. After a brief period in the private studio of Adolf Mayer, Kerkovius was drawn back to Hölzel, who at the time had accepted a professorship at the Königlich Württembergische Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Stuttgart. As a master student, in 1911 Kerkovius became his assistant and taught Hölzel’s theory herself in a master studio in the academy. Among her students was <a href="/en/atlas/personen/johannes-itten" title="Johannes Itten">Johannes Itten</a>, who was to later become her teacher during her time at the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/idee/bauhaus-weimar" title="Bauhaus Weimar">Bauhaus in Weimar</a>. When WWI broke out, Kerkovius was deprived of her German citizenship. As a foreigner, from now on she was no longer permitted to teach at the academy; in her private studio, she taught foreign students who had been refused places to study at the academy.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-ida-kerkovius" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/ida_kerkovius.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="326" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-ida-kerkovius"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1920" title="1920">1920</a> Kerkovius decided to enrol at the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/idee/bauhaus-weimar" title="Bauhaus Weimar">Bauhaus in Weimar</a>, where she studied during the winter term until <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1923" title="1923">1923</a>. She developed her painting further in the classes of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/johannes-itten" title="Johannes Itten">Johannes Itten</a>, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky" title="Wassily Kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky</a>. Using strong colours, she worked to break down the limitations of representational art. After completing the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/lehre/vorkurs-johannes-itten" title="Preliminary Course by Johannes Itten">preliminary course</a> Kerkovius, like most of the women at the Bauhaus, transferred to the <a href="/en/atlas/werke/weaving-workshop" title="Weaving Workshop">weaving workshop</a>. Here, she showed great talent and wove carpets for <a href="/en/atlas/personen/walter-gropius" title="Walter Gropius">Walter Gropius</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Paul Klee</a>, who adored her work. She saw her talent as an opportunity to make a future living for herself. In <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1924" title="1924">1924</a> the painter and weaver returned to Stuttgart, where she taught and continued to weave. From 1934 to 1939, Kerkovius travelled to Norway, Belgium, France, Bulgaria and Italy; in between, she visited her homeland. During the period in which the National Socialists came to power, Kerkovius did in fact earn her living mainly with her weaving work. Her close friend Hanna Bekker vom Rath, initially Kerkovius’s apprentice, then an art dealer, secretly sold Kerkovius’s art during the time in which her painting was viewed as "degenerate".  In 1944 her studio in Stuttgart was bombed out, which is why very few of Kerkovius’s works from the years before the bombing exist.</p><p>In 1950 Ida Kerkovius became a member of the Deutscher Künstlerbund. Between 1950 and 1965 she travelled frequently: to Ischia in 1952 and 1954, Brittany in 1954, the South of France in 1956 and Lake Garda in 1965. In 1954 Kerkovius was awarded the German Order of Merit, First Class. The same year, she became an honorary member of the artists’ guild of Esslingen/Neckar. In 1955 she was awarded the first prize of the exhibition "Ischia im Bilde deutscher Maler". She became a professor in 1958 and taught into old age. In 1962 she was made an honorary member of the Staatliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Stuttgart and, a year later, an honorary board member of the Deutscher Künstlerbund.</p><p>Ida Kerkovius died on 7 June 1970 in Stuttgart.</p><p> </p><p>Literature:</p><p>Rudolf Bayer, biography Ida Kerkovius, Galerie Bayer, <a href="http://www.galerie-bayer-bietigheim.de/index.htm?/kuenstler/kerkovius/index.htm">http://www.galerie-bayer-bietigheim.de/index.htm?/kuenstler/kerkovius/index.htm</a>, downloaded on 17.06.2014; Adrienne Braun, “Die späte Schülerin. Serie: Frauen am Bauhaus”, in: ART. Das Kunstmagazin 2002, issue 11, pp. 60-66, <a href="http://www.art-magazin.de/div/heftarchiv/2002/11/EGOWTEGWPPWOOPOGWTRWPSAA/Die-sp%E4te-Sch%FClerin">http://www.art-magazin.de/div/heftarchiv/2002/11/EGOWTEGWPPWOOPOGWTRWPSAA/Die-sp%E4te-Sch%FClerin</a>, downloaded on 17.06.2014; Annette Bußmann, “Ida Kerkovius | Biographie bei Fembio”, <a href="http://www.fembio.org/biographie.php/frau/biographie/ida-kerkovius/">http://www.fembio.org/biographie.php/frau/biographie/ida-kerkovius/</a>, downloaded on 17.06.2014; Anne-Kathrin Herber, “Frauen an deutschen Kunstakademien im 20. Jahrhundert. Ausbildungsmöglichkeiten für Künstlerinnen ab 1919 unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der süddeutschen Kunstakademien”, dissertation, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg 2009; Stadt Stuttgart, “Ida Kerkovius”, <a href="http://www.stuttgart.de/item/show/33860">http://www.stuttgart.de/item/show/33860</a>, downloaded on 17.06.2014; Ingrid Radewaldt, “Ida Kerkovius”, in: Ulrike Müller, “Bauhaus-Frauen. Meisterinnen in Kunst, Handwerk und Design”, Munich 2009, pp. 28-33.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-ida-kerkovius#comments Bauhaus Faces Fri, 27 Jun 2014 20:28:52 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8666 at http://bauhaus-online.de Children Programme at the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/children-programme-at-the-bauhaus-archiv-berlin <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/children-programme-at-the-bauhaus-archiv-berlin"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h2>bauhaus_vacation_programme</h2><p>Programme 2014</p><p><br />The bauhaus_vacation_programme offers 5-day morning programmes introducing the Bauhaus, architecture and design (in German) for 8 to 12 year olds.</p><p>Dates are available in the summer holidays (14–18 July) and autumn holidays (20–24 Oct.). <br />For further information and booking: Bärbel Mees, tel. 030/254002-43, <span class="spamspan"><span class="u">visit</span> [at] <span class="d">bauhaus [dot] de</span></span></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/children-programme-at-the-bauhaus-archiv-berlin#comments Berlin Education Fri, 27 Jun 2014 19:35:14 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8663 at http://bauhaus-online.de The Journey to Tunisia. Klee, Macke, Moilliet http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-journey-to-tunisia-klee-macke-moilliet <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>2014 is the hundredth anniversary of the legendary trip to Tunis that the three artist friends Paul Klee, August Macke and Louis Moilliet took in April 1914.</p><p>The Zentrum Paul Klee is taking the date as an opportunity to bring this important moment in modern art back to life, and to bring together the works produced on the trip or inspired by it for the first time in a comprehensive exhibition for almost thirty years.</p><p>It is Zentrum Paul Klee’s ambitious goal to bring together as many of the three artists‘ works – now scattered across the whole world – and to reveal the fascinating pictorial ‘competition’ that inspired Klee and Macke in particular to produce their supreme artistic achievements.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-journey-to-tunisia-klee-macke-moilliet" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/ma_photo_am_strand_von_st._germain_1914_0.jpg" alt="" title="August Macke, Paul Klee on the beach of St. Germain, 1914 (from the photo album of August Macke) LWL-Museum für Kunst und Kultur. Westfälisches Landesmuseum, Münster" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="367" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-journey-to-tunisia-klee-macke-moilliet"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the course of a stay in Tunisia that lasted just two weeks, Paul Klee produced 35 watercolours and 13 drawings, August Macke 33 watercolours and 79 drawings in three sketch books. Louis Moilliet was less productive in Tunisia, and produced his most important works during later stays in Morocco and Southern Spain. For Paul Klee Tunisia remained an important source of inspiration for a long time. He repeatedly drew inspiration from his memories of the trip or the pictures that arose from it, and even in the early 1930s he made over 20 works that refer to the event.</p><p>The Tunis trip is a key event in 20th-century art history. Since Ernst-Gerhard Güse’s 1982 exhibition and the catalogue produced to accompany it, now long out of print, new research has thrown up much new evidence. It sheds new light on the history and prehistory of the Tunis trip, as well as its after-effects, and illuminates the context, both historical and art-historical, of the birth of modern watercolour painting. Zentrum Paul Klee has taken on the task of re-examining and honouring the art-historically significant event in a comprehensive, art-historically grounded publication. All the works exhibited are given full-page illustrations of very high printing quality, thus allowing a wide audience to grasp the Tunis trip as a visual experience.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-journey-to-tunisia-klee-macke-moilliet#comments Bauhaus Faces Exhibition Painting Thu, 12 Jun 2014 09:29:55 +0000 Zentrum Paul Klee, Bern 8647 at http://bauhaus-online.de Kandinsky, Klee, Schiele ... http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/kandinsky-klee-schiele <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/kandinsky-klee-schiele" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/wassily_kandinsky_kompositi.jpg" alt="" title="Wassily Kandinsky, Composition, 1922 from the Bauhaus portfolio No. IV Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Graphische Sammlung " class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="413" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/kandinsky-klee-schiele"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The significance of print portfolios for the early twentieth-century avant-garde has hitherto been underestimated. On closer inspection, the great potential of this collaborative art form becomes evident – as an origin for technical experimentation and a means of publicly disseminating artistic ideas, but also as a way of producing objects for sale on the art market. <br /><br />The exhibition will present a selection of print portfolios from the rich holdings of the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, among them the virtually unknown "SEMA-Portfolio" of 1912 as well as sheets from the four important and extremely rare "Bauhaus Prints: New European Graphic Art" portfolios of the 1920s. <br /><br />Masterworks of European avant-garde printmaking will be on view – from <a href="/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky" title="Wassily Kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky</a> and <a href="/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Paul Klee</a> to Franz Marc and Egon Schiele.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/kandinsky-klee-schiele#comments Bauhaus Faces Exhibition Thu, 12 Jun 2014 08:56:55 +0000 Staatsgalerie Stuttgart 8645 at http://bauhaus-online.de Gläserne Zeit (Age Of Glass) http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/glaeserne-zeit-age-of-glass <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“The crystal will soon be your downfall – the crystal [...]. Yes, Miss Clara. It is a dark prophecy, one which I believe is also relevant to our time. We have named the ages of man after the materials, which the people of those ages worked with; we are familiar with the Stone, Iron and Bronze Age. And yet we do not have a name for the present age, although the Bauhaus especially shows us what its most important material is: glass. But good fortune and glass... I want to call it the age of glass, because it is so fragile and because it will all shatter. The crystal will soon be your downfall.”</p><p>With these fictitious words of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Paul Klee’</a>s the author of the “Bauhaus novel”, Andreas Hillger, sums up the era of the Weimar Republic and with it the time in which the Bauhaus emerged, prospered and was ultimately banned. The “age of glass” stands for the building material which dominated at the Bauhaus and, at the same time, symbolises the political fragility of the interwar period between <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1919" title="1919">1919</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1933" title="1933">1933</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/glaeserne-zeit-age-of-glass" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/hillger_0.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="261" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/glaeserne-zeit-age-of-glass"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In his novel, by reference to three protagonists, who study together at the Bauhaus – middle-class Clara, left-wing Carl and the older Lukas, who works in the <a href="/en/atlas/werke/weaving-workshop" title="Weaving Workshop">weaving workshop</a> – Hillger reflects on the goals of the Bauhaus, the dreams of the students, the noisy parties and the external and internal political hostilities. This, or something like it, may well have been what life was like at the Bauhaus. Their personal affections and tragedies, their friendships and political alignments show the broad spectrum of young people at the Bauhaus. While the communist Carl works as a builder on the <a href="/en/atlas/werke/dessau-toerten-housing-estate" title="Dessau-Törten Housing Estate">Törten Estate in Dessau</a>, accompanies <a href="/en/atlas/personen/hannes-meyer" title="Hannes Meyer">Hannes Meyer</a> as a photographer and witnesses the emergence of the <a href="/en/atlas/werke/trade-union-school-of-adgb" title="Trade Union School of ADGB">ADGB school</a> in Bernau from the development of the building land to the workers’ strike and opening ceremony and ultimately leaves for Russia with the Director, Lukas – initially a devotee of the Mazdaznan religion, loyal to <a href="/en/atlas/personen/johannes-itten" title="Johannes Itten">Johannes Itten</a> at the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/idee/bauhaus-weimar" title="Bauhaus Weimar">Bauhaus Weimar</a> before <a href="/en/atlas/personen/gunta-stoelzl" title="Gunta Stölzl">Gunta Stölzl</a> brings him to the weaving workshop at the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/idee/bauhaus-dessau" title="Bauhaus Dessau">Bauhaus Dessau </a>– becomes increasingly right-wing after losing his job in the advertising department of the Junkers factory, and finally joins the NSDAP. His political views harden over time and once again, one comes to understand the circumstances and prevailing sentiment that permitted the right to come to power. And Clara, who arrives at the Bauhaus and breaks away from her parents because they disagree with their daughter’s choice to study there; Clara, who openly poses naked as a life model for painting classes of Josef Albers’s preliminary course and is arrested by the police for indecency as a result; Clara, who aborts Carl’s child in order to remain independent and who hopes the Bauhaus will bring innovation, a new start and freedom, only to be ultimately trapped by conventional arrangements (weaving workshop, child, marriage).</p><p>With an eye for detail, Hillger repeatedly refers parenthetically to real contemporary political and cultural events, but also to the quirks of the Bauhaus masters and incidents that occurred beyond everyday life at the Bauhaus, which also make the book a pleasure for readers familiar with the Bauhaus, the 1920s and the 1930s. This novel is a must for all those who, like Hillger, have wondered what life at the Bauhaus was really like.</p><p>The novel has been published in German by <a href="http://www.osburg-verlag.de/buch/gläserne-zeit">Osburg Verlag</a>, 238 pages, ISBN: 9783955100223, price: €19,95</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/glaeserne-zeit-age-of-glass#comments Publication Sat, 31 May 2014 18:06:33 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8639 at http://bauhaus-online.de Bauhaus in Norwegian http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-in-norwegian <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In Norwegian art history, the influence of The Bauhaus has been underexplored. "Bauhaus in Norwegian" explores the school’s influence on Norwegian design, visual arts, architecture and art education. It recounts the unknown story of three Norwegian students at the Bauhaus: Herman Espeler Brodtkorb, Ola Mørk Sandvik and Hans Mollø-Christensen, as well as Edvard Heiberg, who was a professor at the school. Bauhaus in Norwegian also portrays internationally renowned Bauhaus artists that lived in Norway, such as Ivo Pannaggi and Vilhelm Bjerke Petersen.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-in-norwegian" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/739b.jpg" alt="" title="Marianne Brandt, Tee-Extraktkännchen MT49, 1924 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="345" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-in-norwegian"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The world famous German designer, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/marianne-brandt" title="Marianne Brandt">Marianne Brandt,</a> married to the Norwegian Erik Brandt, is presented as a central figure. Brandt is the protagonist in Notes on MB (2014), a commissioned work by the Danish contemporary artist, Pia Rönicke.</p><p>"Bauhaus in Norwegian" opens up a new field in Norwegian art history.</p><p>Exhibtion until 31st August, 2014</p><p>Curators: Lars Mørch Finborud, Milena Høgsberg and Thomas Flor</p><p><strong>Publication</strong>: "Bauhaus på norsk" is published by Orfeus Publishing (Norwegian/English).</p><p></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-in-norwegian#comments Bauhaus Faces Design Exhibition Painting Photography Tue, 27 May 2014 20:30:12 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8634 at http://bauhaus-online.de Human-Space-Machine http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/human-space-machine <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"Human–Space–Machine" demonstrates how live performance and stage experiments were central to the Bauhaus’ production. The Bauhaus scene functioned as an experimental laboratory for dance, abstract studies of the body, movement and theatrical mechanisms. The Bauhauslers sought to collectively explore the relationship between man and technology and a new human subjectivity that could respond to social and political changes in the wake of the First World War. <a href="/atlas/personen/walter-gropius" title="Walter Gropius">Walter Gropius</a>, the founder of the Bauhaus, established the <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/werkstaetten/buehne">Bauhaus stage workshop</a> as a place for interdisciplinary collaborations where students and professors from all the other workshops could experiment without the pressure to produce designs that could generate revenue to the school.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/human-space-machine" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/01_laszlo-moholy-nagy_kinetisch-konstruktives-system.jpg" alt="" title="László Moholy-Nagy, Kinetic constructive system, 1922 Theaterwissenschaftliche Sammlung, University of Cologne" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="310" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/human-space-machine"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The exhibition will present central works by artists like <a href="/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky" title="Wassily Kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky,</a> <a href="/atlas/personen/laszlo-moholy-nagy" title="László Moholy-Nagy">László Moholy-Nagy</a> and <a href="/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a>, in addition to reconstructions of the costumes used in Schlemmer’s "Triadic Ballet". The Norwegian dance group "The Haus of Bau" will bring to life the reconstructed costumes through a series of interpretative and improvisational dances performed in the exhibition throughout the summer.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/human-space-machine#comments Bauhaus Faces Design Dessau Exhibition Painting Photography Tue, 27 May 2014 19:49:08 +0000 Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau 8632 at http://bauhaus-online.de Alfredo Bortoluzzi: A Bauhaus Face http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/alfredo-bortoluzzi-a-bauhaus-face <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Alfredo Bortoluzzi was born to Italian parents in Karlsruhe and grew up there, making regular visits to his relatives in Venice. After completing his secondary school leaving examination, he was accepted to study at the art academy in Venice, but turned this down in favour of a place at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Karlsruhe – a choice motivated by the more modern teaching methods in Karlsruhe, which made the curriculum in Venice seem antiquated and outdated by comparison. Bortoluzzi states that his tutors during his student days from <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1924" title="1924">1924</a> to <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1927" title="1927">1927</a> included Hermann Gehri, who taught figurative drawing, and most notably Walter Conz, in whose etching class he gained his diploma as a masters student. Offered a position as an assistant to Conz, he chose instead to continue his studies at the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/idee/bauhaus-dessau" title="Bauhaus Dessau">Bauhaus Dessau</a>. He enrolled there for one term in <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1927" title="1927">1927</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1928" title="1928">1928</a> respectively and returned again in <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1930" title="1930">1930</a> as a guest student. After taking <a href="/en/atlas/personen/josef-albers" title="Josef Albers">Josef Albers</a>’s <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/lehre/Vorkurs-josef-albers" title="Preliminary Course by Josef Albers">preliminary course</a>, he attended the drawing and painting classes of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky" title="Wassily Kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Paul Klee</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a>’s Bauhaus <a href="/en/atlas/werke/bauhaus-stage" title="Bauhaus Stage">stage</a>. In 1930 his work was shown in Galerie Ferdinand Möller, Berlin, in a joint exhibition with other Bauhauslers sponsored by Paul Klee and organised by Ernst Kállai. In <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1931" title="1931">1931</a> Galerie Flechtheim, Berlin, showed an exhibition of works by Paul Klee and Alfredo Bortoluzzi. In <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1933" title="1933">1933</a>, he participated alongside other Bauhaus artists in an exhibition in Düsseldorf; the exhibition was closed and the works condemned by the National Socialists as “degenerate” art.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/alfredo-bortoluzzi-a-bauhaus-face" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/f3453.jpg" alt="" title="Grit Kallin-Fischer, Portrait Alfredo Bortoluzzi, Bauhaus Dessau, ca. 1927-1928, Reproduktion 1968 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="270" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/alfredo-bortoluzzi-a-bauhaus-face"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Prevented from painting, Bortoluzzi devoted himself to his further passion, dance. He built on the principles that he had learned under <a href="/en/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a> and took ballet lessons in Karlsruhe. In 1936 he moved to Paris and studied classical ballet at Lubov Egorova’s École de Danse. He won prizes, became principal dancer at the Paris Opera, worked as a choreographer and designed stage sets. In autumn 1936 he returned to Germany, initially taking a position as ballet master at Stadttheater Aachen; engagements as a dancer, choreographer and stage designer in various cities in Germany followed up to 1944. After WWII, he first worked as a choreographer and set designer at Badisches Staatstheater Karlsruhe before taking up other positions in Dresden, Bielefeld und Essen. In 1958, a serious knee injury ended his career as a dancer. However, Bortoluzzi had never given up painting; he now devoted himself entirely to it and moved to Italy, to Peschici in the province of Foggia in the Appulia region.</p><p>In 1946 Bortoluzzi’s work was shown in Heidelberg in a joint exhibition with <a href="/en/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky" title="Wassily Kandinsky">Kandinsky</a>, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Klee</a> and other former Bauhauslers. In 1947 his work was shown in Kunstverein Karlsruhe and a number of other exhibitions followed: in 1948 in Baden-Baden, 1950 in Cologne and 1954 in Essen. His work was shown in joint and solo exhibitions throughout Italy. In 1968 he took part in the exhibition "50 Jahre Bauhaus" in Stuttgart. His native Foggia paid tribute to Bortoluzzi with a solo exhibition in 1975 and a large retrospective in 1983. After his death, Bortoluzzi’s work was shown in numerous international exhibitions and retrospectives, including "Bauhaus 1919-1933: da Klee a Kandinsky, da Gropius a Mies van der Rohe" (Milan, 1996), "ABSTRACTA. 
Austria-Germania-Italia 1919-1939: Die andere entartete Kunst" (Museion museum for modern and contemporary art, Bolzano, 1997) and the retrospective "Alfredo Bortoluzzi – die Lehre des Bauhauses" of Mario Botta (Kunstmuseum Mendrisio, Tessin, 2001). In 2009 the foundation Fondazione Banca del Monte in Foggia acquired the assets of Bortoluzzi’s creative estate, which it has been researching and presenting to the public in a series of solo exhibitions since 2010.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Literature and references:</strong></p><p>Exhibition catalogueAlfredo Bortoluzzi - Die Lektion des Bauhauses, text by Simone Soldini, Gisela Boote, Anna Ruchat, Susanne Franco, Claudio Fontana, Mario Botta, Mendrisio, 2001</p><p>Fondo Alfredo Bortoluzzi. Quaderni 1-4, ed. by Gaetano Cristino and Guido Pensato. Foggia 2010-2013.</p><p><a href="http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfredo_Bortoluzzi">http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfredo_Bortoluzzi</a></p><p><a href="http://www.fondazionebdmfoggia.com/news/dettaglio.asp?id=327">http://www.fondazionebdmfoggia.com/news/dettaglio.asp?id=327</a></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/alfredo-bortoluzzi-a-bauhaus-face#comments Bauhaus Faces Sun, 11 May 2014 19:43:55 +0000 Stefan Nienhaus / Burckhard Kieselbach 8614 at http://bauhaus-online.de Paul Klee and the Oriental Carpet http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/paul-klee-and-the-oriental-carpet <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In 1910, Munich was the setting for a large and unprecedented exhibition of ‘Masterpieces of Mohammedan Art’, presenting 3600 objects from European, Egyptian and Turkish collections. The exhibition made a tremendous impression on artists such as Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc, and Henri Matisse travelled to Munich especially to see it.</p><p>For <a href="/en/atlas/personen/paul-klee" title="Paul Klee">Paul Klee</a>, however – who had been living in Munich since 1906 – it does not appear to be certain whether he even noticed the epoch-making event. There is no evidence and there are no personal notes by him to indicate that Klee visited the exhibition. It is certainly surprising that the artist – who was later to be linked so strongly with the Orient – apparently had no interest at this point in Islamic arts and crafts, including Oriental carpets.</p><h2><strong>Journey to Tunis</strong></h2><p>Even during his famous journey to Tunis in 1914, Klee – as can be seen from his journal notes – was impressed only by the light and the landscape. He completely ignored Oriental art, even though he could hardly have avoided walking on carpets during his time in Tunisia.</p><p>In the Tunis souk, where the outspread carpets must have been hard to miss, the souvenirs he bought to take back for his wife were ‘a fine knife and leather cushions. Two. Also a nice amulet, bracelets and an old coin.’ Not without ‘mistrusting’ the ‘Orientals’, as his travel diary records.<a href="#_ftn1" title="">[1]</a></p><p>Klee appears to have had little interest in Tunisian art, calligraphy, carpets, the abstract decorations on the mosques – in short, everything that specifically constitutes the country’s culture. The watercolours he painted while in Tunisia basically only show motifs of the sort that the average tourist would normally take snapshots of – although Klee, in contrast to his travelling companion August Macke, left out any human figures and concentrated entirely on the experience of the bright and pure colours of the south.</p><p>‘Colour has taken possession of me,’ Klee noted during an excursion to the interior, to Kairouan. ‘I no longer need to search for it. It has taken hold of me forever, I know this. This is what this happy moment means: I and colour are one. I am a painter.’<a href="#_ftn2" title="">[2]</a> What became known as the ‘Tunis journey’ was undoubtedly an inspiration for Klee. It turned an artist who had until then mainly focused on graphic work into the painter who is still popular today.</p><p>By contrast, the culture of the Orient appears to have made little impression on Klee. The idea for an Oriental journal had in fact not been his own; Louis Moilliet, the third painter in the group, had already visited Tunisia once before and had probably enthusiastically described the light and colour there to Macke and Klee.</p><p>It seems, therefore, that Klee only began to digest the influence of the Orient afterwards. However, four months after he returned from the visit to Tunisia, which had lasted just under two weeks, the First World War broke out in August 1914. The war years – Klee was involved in a noncombatant role in the last two years of the fighting – initially seem to have led to his experiences during the journey to Tunis remaining largely unassimilated. During this period, the metaphysical element comes to the fore for Klee intellectually and in his artistic work. This was Klee’s way of dealing with the war – basically not situating it in the here and now, but regarding it as something timeless and cosmic.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/paul-klee-and-the-oriental-carpet" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/kleeteppich.jpg" alt="" title="Paul Klee, carpet, 1927, from: Auf der Suche nach dem Orient. Paul Klee. Teppich der Erinnerung, Zentrum Paul Klee Bern (ed.) (Ostfildern, 2009, p. 147)" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="405" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/paul-klee-and-the-oriental-carpet"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h2><strong>Eastern memories and recollections</strong></h2><p>After the war, however, something surprising happens with Klee: his experience of the Orient resurfaces for him. He now begins to produce pictures that show Oriental influence in their motifs and style. The experience seems to be enhanced in memory, appearing more real than it did when he was actually there. During the 1920s, Oriental motifs become more frequent in his work. In 1922, for example, he painted the ‘Arabian City’ and in 1924 the ‘Oriental Castle’<a href="#_ftn1" title="">[3]</a>; in the same year, Klee created – in ‘Mural’ and ‘Curtain’ – paintings that are quite obviously based on carpets, or to be more precise on the monochrome Kilims, with their detailed patterns, made by the Tunisian Berbers. Klee may have seen actual carpets of this type when he was in Tunisia in 1914; or perhaps he examined carpets from the Maghreb later on. No exact information is available. In any case, due to its frequency the Orient became a kind of trademark in Klee’s pictorial subjects during the 1920s. Wilhelm Hausenstein’s book Kairuan oder eine Geschichte vom Maler Klee [Kairouan, or a Tale of the Painter Klee], published in 1921, even transfigures Klee’s visit to the city during the journey to Tunisia into a kind of awakening experience for him. The book further intensifies Klee’s own statements about his destiny as a painter, which already contain mystical elements themselves. These include his vague hint to Hausenstein that his mother’s forebears ‘might have been Oriental, via southern France’.<a href="#_ftn2" title="">[4]</a></p><h2><strong>Mutual influences at the Bauhaus</strong></h2><p>Klee then appears to have begun to style himself retrospectively as an Oriental. In addition, in 1923 he more or less accidentally became the head of the weaving workshop at the Bauhaus for a brief period and was thus placed in a quite practical way in connection with carpets – the great domain of Oriental art. It was flat-woven textiles that were produced at the Bauhaus, rather than hand-knotted carpets. In any case, the weaving workshop at the Bauhaus was initially quite amateurish. The Bauhaus students Gunta Stölzl and Benita Otte, who inaugurated the weaving workshop on their own initiative, had to go to Krefeld to begin with in order to learn weaving techniques and how to dye yarn. There was no one at the Bauhaus to teach them these methods. However, the naivety on the topic at the college had advantages – the weavers were able to work without guidelines or the burdens of tradition. The Bauhaus in any case wanted to innovate in many ways. Klee only taught the weavers the basics of form and colour, but not weaving, since he himself had no command of the craft. It was his basic teaching that was important here. Conversely, the technique of weaving appears to have influenced Klee’s art and his painting technique. However, this was again only in retrospect. At the Bauhaus, Stölzl and Otte anticipated in textiles around 1923 what Klee was only to translate to the canvas later, after travelling to the Orient for a second time.</p><h2><strong>Journey to Egypt</strong></h2><p>Particularly after Klee’s journey to Egypt from mid-December 1928 to mid-January 1929, the impressions of the southern light, the ‘View of the Land of Fruits’ (the title of a painting from 1932) on the Nile and the techniques of weaving fuse into new forms of pictorial invention. Major works emerged after the journey to Egypt, such as ‘Main Path and Byways’ (1929) or the watercolour ‘Pyramids’ (1930), and then above all the cipher paintings inspired perhaps by hieroglyphs in Klee’s late work up to his death in 1940, such as ‘Rich Harbour’ of 1938.<a href="#_ftn1" title="">[5]</a> A quite different influence now becomes visible here as well, however, as the paintings now strikingly resemble the raffia weaving<a href="#_ftn2" title="">[6]</a> of the Kuba people of the Congo – particularly the appliqué skirts of the Ngeende group. These raffia works are highly admired by connoisseurs.<a href="#_ftnref" title="">[7]</a></p><h2><strong>State of research</strong></h2><p>Whether and where Klee might have seen such works, or whether he again only discovered them in retrospect while intellectually and artistically assimilating the journey to Egypt, has not yet been satisfactorily investigated. However, there are features noticeably in common between the art of Islamic carpet-making and Klee’s work following his two Oriental journeys. In the few studies that have been conducted so far on Klee’s relationship to the Orient, an ‘elective affinity’<a href="#_ftn1" title="">[8]</a> has been mentioned, for example. Any direct influence is denied or dismissed with the meaningless statement, ‘It is unnecessary to offer any explanations for this affinity.’<a href="#_ftn2" title="">[9]</a> It is claimed that there are merely ‘parallels’ between two worlds – Klee’s inner world and the ‘millennia-old Islamic world.’</p><p>So far, there is only circumstantial evidence to show that this view needs to be contradicted and that there certainly do exist direct and indirect influences from Klee’s journeys and probably through his knowledge of publications on the topic. However, the subject of ‘Klee and the Oriental Carpet’ has not yet been explicitly investigated in art-historical research. It is only recently that textiles, and in particular Oriental weaving and carpets, have been brought into focus as a source of inspiration for so-called classic modernism.<a href="#_ftn3" title="">[10]</a></p><h2><strong>Ex oriente ars</strong></h2><p>It is certainly remarkable that almost all of the discoveries and innovations of modernism had precursors and sources of inspiration outside of Europe. With regard to ‘Negro sculpture’ as a model for Expressionist and Cubist sculpture, this has long since become a commonplace.<a href="#_ftn1" title="">[11]</a> It is no longer controversial nowadays to exhibit Picasso’s paintings in the museum along with fetishes and ancestor figures from Africa.<a href="#_ftn2" title="">[12]</a> Art history has already shifted its position here towards a subject foreign to it. With regard to the Oriental carpet and its potential influence on modernist art, this rapprochement has yet to take place, however. The reasons for this peculiar delay appear to lie in the fact that textile work has previously not been regarded as an art form in Europe. Weaving has only existed here in the form of tapestry (Gobelins); otherwise, carpets have been imported from the Orient – and for a very long period already, as depictions of carpets in paintings by Hans Holbein and Lorenzo Lotto show. However, there is a lack of an indigenous European carpet-making culture; weaving was for a long period regarded by art historians as an inferior handicraft, and one that was also almost exclusively carried out by women. It is only today, in the wake of globalization and gender studies, that our eyes have opened to the previously overlooked influence of the Oriental carpet on modernism. Paul Klee’s work has yet to be reassessed on the basis of these new premises.</p><p></p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[1]</a> Ernst-Gerhard Güse, ed., Die Tunisreise: Klee, Macke, Moilliet(Stuttgart: Hatje, 1982; exhib. cat., Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte Münster), p. 52.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[2]</a> Carola Giedion-Welcker, Paul Klee in Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten(Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1961), figure on p. 43.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[3]</a> Michael Baumgartner, ed.,Auf der Suche nach dem Orient: Paul Klee, Teppich der Erinnerung (Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2009; exhib. cat., Zentrum Paul Klee, Berne),figure on p. 225.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[4]</a> Cited after Michael Baumgartner, ‘Paul Klee und der Mythos vom Orient’, in ibid.,Auf der Suche nach dem Orient2009 (see note 3), p. 132.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[5]</a> Carola Giedion-Welcker,Paul Klee (see note 2), figure on pp. 150–1.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[6]</a> Raffia is a plant belonging to the palm family.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[7]</a> Cf. John Gillow,African Textiles: Colour and Creativity across a Continent(London: Thames &amp; Hudson, 2003), p. 190.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[8]</a> Eloise Brac de la Perrière and Jean-Pierre van Staevel, ‘Die islamische Kunst im Spiegel von Paul Klees Werk’, in Baumgartner,Auf der Suche nach dem Orient 2009 (see note 3), p. 23.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[9]</a> Ibid.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[10]</a> Oddly, several large exhibitions on the topic opened in 2013: ‘Kunst &amp; Textil. Stoff als Material und Idee in der Moderne von Klimt bis heute (Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg), ‘Marokkanische Teppiche und die Kunst der Moderne’ (Neue Sammlung, Munich) and ‘Decorum’ (Museé d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris).</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[11]</a> Carl Einstein’s bookNegerplastik was published as long ago as 1915.</p><p><a href="#_ftnref" title="">[12]</a> As in the Berggruen Collection at the State Museums in Berlin.</p><p><strong><br /></strong></p><p><strong>Ronald Berg works as art critic and journalist in Berlin.</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/paul-klee-and-the-oriental-carpet#comments Bauhaus Faces Painting Research Fri, 21 Mar 2014 21:02:22 +0000 Ronald Berg 8584 at http://bauhaus-online.de Once a ‘Palace for Cars’ – Today Due for the Wrecking Ball http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/once-a-%E2%80%98palace-for-cars%E2%80%99-today-due-for-the-wrecking-ball <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>‘The multi-storey car park in Kantstrasse (1929/30) is the last building by the architect Hermann Zweigenthal, alias Herman Herrey, that has survived unaltered in Germany and it also represents an early work by his partner Richard Paulick, who later rose to fame. Above all, however, it is a unique monument to motor transport that is of national significance – probably the most important large-scale indoor car park dating from the period of interwar modernism in Germany.’ So read the decision taken in 2010 by Berlin’s State Council for the Preservation of Historic Buildings and Monuments. The building had already been made a listed monument in 1991. It is all the more surprising that the owners of the Kant Parking Garage have now applied for permission to demolish it.</p><p>Following a trip he had made to America in 1929, Louis Serlin, a Berlin businessman, commissioned the Viennese architect Hermann Zweigenthal and Richard Paulick – a former Bauhaus member who was head of Walter Gropius’s architectural office in Berlin at the time – to design Germany’s first multi-storey car park, the first large indoor parking garage in Berlin, in Kantstrasse 126–127 in the Charlottenburg district. In collaboration with the Lohmüller, Korschelt and Renker architectural office, which had specialized in multi-storey car park construction, a magnificent ‘palace for cars’ was to be designed for Berlin based on American models – on an extremely small site. The team of architects successfully devised a multi-storey car park that was unprecedented in Germany, made of reinforced concrete with a glass-curtain façade (made by the Frankfurt glass-roof manufacturers Claus Meyn KG), which is still preserved largely in its original state. The building represents a double helix in concrete, with separate entrance and exit ramps for cars, and with sliding gates in the interior that allow separate individual compartments to be closed. Six storeys rise on an area of 16,000 square metres, with space for 300 cars. The façade is faced in clinker and decorated with broad rows of windows. The sign reading ‘Kantgaragen’ can still be seen on the side. Spaces for car washing, car repair workshops and a petrol station are installed on the ground floor. Only the carwash spaces have given way to additional parking spaces today; the petrol station and repair workshops are still in operation and can still be seen through the open façade from the street. When the modern car park was opened in October 1930, Serlin’s conception of a palace for cars had been fully implemented: the Kant Parking Garage was also called ‘Kant Garage Palace’ or ‘Serlin ramp building’ after its two-way spiral ramp.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/once-a-%E2%80%98palace-for-cars%E2%80%99-today-due-for-the-wrecking-ball" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/bhd_petras_kantstrasse_126_127-35.jpg" alt="" title="The Kant Garage Palace in Kanststraße 126/27 in Berlin-Charlottenburg" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="360" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/once-a-%E2%80%98palace-for-cars%E2%80%99-today-due-for-the-wrecking-ball"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1930" title="1930">1930</a>, the Kant Parking Garage was one of only two multi-storeys of this type that existed in Europe, and even up to 1957 it was the only one in Germany. After Serlin had been compulsorily dispossessed in 1938 because he was Jewish, the Nazis ‘Aryanized’ the Kant Parking Garage and used it for their own purposes. At the end of the war, the former owner returned to Berlin and found his ‘palace for cars’ almost completely undamaged. Five years later, the building was returned to his ownership. Right down to the present day, this historic witness to the history of the automobile is still in use as a private garage. Admittedly, it looks rather run down, but there’s nothing that could not be repaired by restoration work. And although the Kant Parking Garage is the last surviving building by Zweigenthal and represents one of the unique monuments to the architectural history of the Weimar Republic, its current owner has applied to the Lower Authority for Historic Monuments for permission to demolish it for economic reasons. The building is the last surviving multi-storey car park dating from the 1920s, but there appears to be little public interest in preserving historic vehicle structures.</p><p>There has only been a slight murmur of protest in the press, although it did include a demand for this unique building to preserved and used appropriately. René Hartmann, for example, wrote inTagesspiegelthat there was probably no better location than the Kant Parking Garage for presenting the automobile collection of the German Museum of Technology in Berlin, currently collecting dust, in a suitable setting: an excellent idea. Another journalist criticized the current owner’s failure to carry out maintenance of the Kant Parking Garage, causing the façade and substance of the building to become dilapidated.</p><p>Serious structural alterations are now also to be carried out in Karl-Marx-Allee 71 as well, on the roof of Block C, the penthouse apartment in which Richard Paulick lived from 1952 until his death in 1979. The old wood-framed windows are to be replaced with insulation glazing. This might be more economically effective, but it would at least severely alter the building’s historic substance in Paulick’s original apartment, which is still largely preserved in its original state. The integrity of the ensemble, with an almost unaltered ground plan, original flooring and old doors, as well as the preserved kitchen wall cupboards and wall-to-wall shelving in Chinese wood, would be destroyed by the insulation glazing. Philipp Oswalt, former Director of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, who is campaigning for the preservation of the Kant Garage as well, says, ‘The loss of the box-type windows would severely alter the appearance and character of the apartment. The airtightness of the windows would also make it necessary to instal ventilation lines in the apartment that would impair the design and proportion of the rooms.’</p><p>The same question arises as with other historic buildings in Berlin, including another palace – the GDR’s Palace of the Republic: why it is that Berlin again and again allows buildings that represent testimony to the past to be converted, architecturally altered, or demolished – only to discover later that it would have been possible to preserve them and use them in practical ways without destroying their character and without removing these records of past eras, whether or not they happen to be attractive. In the final analysis, they are part of Berlin’s architectural history.</p><p> </p><p>Bibliography:</p><p>Bernau, Nicolaus. ‘Auf Verschliess gefahren’,Berliner Zeitung,8 August 2013. Available at: <a href="http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/kultur/kant-garagen-auf-verschleiss-gefahren,10809150,23950430.html">http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/kultur/kant-garagen-auf-verschleiss-gefahren,10809150,23950430.html</a> (accessed 13 September 2013).</p><p>Hartmann, René. ‘Ein Palast, der nach Abgasen duftet’,Der Tagesspiegel,1 August 2013. Available at: <a href="http://www.tagesspiegel.de/kultur/abriss-der-kant-garage-ein-palast-der-nach-abgasen-duftet/8575420.html">http://www.tagesspiegel.de/kultur/abriss-der-kant-garage-ein-palast-der-nach-abgasen-duftet/8575420.html</a> (accessed 29 August 2013).</p><p>Landesdenkmalrat Berlin. Minutes of the State Council for the Preservation of Historic Buildings and Monuments for 27 August 2010. Available at: <a href="http://www.stadtentwicklung.berlin.de/denkmal/landesdenkmalrat/de/beschluesse/download/protokoll_2010_08_27.pdf%20">http://www.stadtentwicklung.berlin.de/denkmal/landesdenkmalrat/de/beschluesse/download/protokoll_2010_08_27.pdf</a> (accessed 13 September 2013).</p><p>Scheffler, Martina. ‘Beliebt bei Reichen, Räubern und der RAF’,Berliner Zeitung,28 July 2013. Available at: <a href="http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/archiv/die-charlottenburger-kant-garagen-waren-193%200-das-erste-garagenhochhaus-berlins--sie-haben-eine-bewegte-geschichte-beliebtbei-reichen--raeubern-und-der-raf,10810590,10732696.html%20">http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/archiv/die-charlottenburger-kant-garagen-waren-193 0-das-erste-garagenhochhaus-berlins--sie-haben-eine-bewegte-geschichte-beliebtbei-reichen--raeubern-und-der-raf,10810590,10732696.html</a> (accessed 29 August 2013).</p><p>Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau. ‘Oswalt: Kant-Garagen erhalten’, press release dated 21 August 2013.</p><p> </p><p> </p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/once-a-%E2%80%98palace-for-cars%E2%80%99-today-due-for-the-wrecking-ball#comments Architecture Berlin History Fri, 21 Mar 2014 20:51:45 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8583 at http://bauhaus-online.de The Last Two Years of the Bauhaus http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-last-two-years-of-the-bauhaus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The <a href="http://www.bauhaus.de">Bauhaus Archive / Museum of Design</a> is publishing for the first time the full text of the letters written to his mother by Bauhaus student Hans Keßler (1906–1997) between <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1931" title="1931">1931</a> and <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1933" title="1933">1933</a>. These historic documents discuss, sometimes in detail, the political and internal events taking place during the last two years of the Bauhaus’s existence. After being driven out of Dessau, the progressive art school moved to Berlin in <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1932" title="1932">1932</a> and was finally closed there in 1933 under pressure from the Nazis.</p><p>Keßler’s letters to his mother are among the few surviving documents on the last two years of the Bauhaus. With their remarks about political events and about the Bauhaus student’s everyday life, they are important primary sources for cultural history. In April 1933, the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/idee/bauhaus-berlin" title="Bauhaus Berlin">Bauhaus building in Berlin</a> was surrounded by the police and SA, searched and sealed off. Several students were temporarily arrested. To prevent political 'Gleichschaltung' (enforced conformity with Nazi doctrine), the last Director of the Bauhaus, <a href="/en/atlas/personen/ludwig-mies-van-der-rohe" title="Ludwig Mies van der Rohe">Ludwig Mies van der Rohe</a>, along with the college’s remaining lecturers in Berlin decided in July 1933 that the Bauhaus was to be dissolved.</p><p>The letters are being published at the start of the ‘Trienniale of Modernism’, which already opened on 27 September 2013. The Trienniale is dedicated to the world cultural legacy of architectural modernism in Germany, and in its opening year the content is based on the current Berlin theme year of ‘Diversity Destroyed’. In 2013, Berlin is commemorating the social and cultural diversity of the city that was destroyed under Nazism.</p><p>Hans Keßler. Die letzten zwei Jahre des Bauhauses. Briefe eines Bauhäuslers an seine Mutter [Hans Keßler: The Last Two Years of the Bauhaus – Letters from a Bauhaus Student to his Mother] is the second volume in the publication series ‘Bauhäusler. Dokumente aus dem Bauhaus-Archiv’, initiated by the Bauhaus Archive in 2012. The letters are illustrated with photographs and artistic work by Hans Kessler from the courses he attended at the Bauhaus.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-last-two-years-of-the-bauhaus" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/kessler_ar.jpg" alt="" title="book cover" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="315" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-last-two-years-of-the-bauhaus"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Hans Keßler. Die letzten zwei Jahre des Bauhauses. Briefe eines Bauhäuslers an seine Mutter, ed. Bauhaus Archive Berlin, 2013. Available at the Bauhaus Archive / Museum of Design in Berlin for € 14.90, or by mail order from the Bauhaus shop for € 19.90.</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-last-two-years-of-the-bauhaus#comments Bauhaus Faces Berlin Dessau Publication Fri, 21 Mar 2014 20:44:10 +0000 Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung in Berlin 8582 at http://bauhaus-online.de The Triadic Ballet http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-triadic-ballet <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Gerhard Bohner’s reconstruction, revision and choreography of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a>’s "Triadic Ballet" (1922), which he carried out for the Berlin Academy of Arts in 1977 in a unique process of artistic reconstruction to accompany a newly commissioned composition by Hans-Joachim Hespos, was one of the most successful productions in recent dance history.</p><p>The Bavarian State Ballet in Munich and the Academy of Arts in Berlin are in 2014 jointly producing a new version of Bohner’s choreography for the first time, sponsored by the Federal Foundation for Culture (Bundeskulturstiftung), with performances by young dancers from the Bavarian State Ballet II, Junior Company. Ivan Liška, the Director of the State Ballet, and ballet mistress Colleen Scott are responsible for the artistic direction and rehearsal. They were both soloists in almost all of the performances and international tours of "TheTriadic Ballet" between 1977 and 1989.</p><p>The production forms part of the ‘Dance Nation Germany’ programme for the Bavarian State Ballet. The programme also features a new production and choreography for Wassily Kandinsky’s ‘The Yellow Sound’ on 4 April 2014 and of "Le Sacre du Printemps" by Mary Wigman on 14 June.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-triadic-ballet" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/das_triadische_ballett_kostuem_310513_113.jpg" alt="" title="The Triadic Ballet, costume, 310513 (113)" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="315" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-triadic-ballet"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"The Triadic Ballet", a ballet by <a href="/en/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer" title="Oskar Schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a></p><p>Reconstruction, revised version and choreography: Gerhard Bohner; music: Hans-Joachim Hespos; costume reconstruction and revision: Ulrike Dietrich. A production by the Academy of Arts (UA 1977).</p><p>Reconstruction and new production 2014: rehearsal Colleen Scott, artistic direction Ivan Liška</p><p>Producer/documentation: Bettina Wagner-Bergelt</p><p>Bavarian State Ballet II / Junior Company</p><p>Music from recording</p><p>Premiere 4 June 2014, Reithalle Munich</p><p>The production will be available for tours from October 2014.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-triadic-ballet#comments Dessau Fri, 21 Mar 2014 20:32:11 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8581 at http://bauhaus-online.de