Bauhaus Online | Magazin http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin en-US Sensing the Future: László Moholy-Nagy, the media and the arts http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/sensing-the-future-laszlo-moholy-nagy-the-media-and-the-arts <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/sensing-the-future-laszlo-moholy-nagy-the-media-and-the-arts" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/lucia_moholy_portraet-laszlo-moholy-nagy_1926_bauhaus-archiv_vg-bild-kunst.jpg" alt="" title="Portrait of László Moholy-Nagy, 1926, photo: Lucia Moholy Photo Credit: Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="348" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/sensing-the-future-laszlo-moholy-nagy-the-media-and-the-arts"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Bauhaus-Archiv in Berlin is presenting an exhibition starting on 8 October 2014 on the complex media art of the famous Constructivist and Bauhaus teacher <a href="/en/atlas/personen/laszlo-moholy-nagy" title="László Moholy-Nagy">László Moholy-Nagy</a> (1895–1946). As a pioneer of multimedia and conceptual art, Moholy-Nagy was one of the twentieth century’s most influential artists. His practical and theoretical engagement with the interactions between the various media and the senses and his experimental use of new media have continued to inspire artists and media theorists right down to the present day. In addition to works by Moholy-Nagy dating from the 1920s to the 1940s, ‘Sensing the Future: László Moholy-Nagy, the Media and the Arts’ will also be presenting works by numerous contemporary artists who have taken up Moholy-Nagy’s ideas, showing his continuing relevance. Some 300 exhibits – ranging from paintings and sculptures, photos, photograms and graphic works to films and stage designs, light and sound installations, tactile boards, manual sculptures and publications – provide multisensory approaches to Moholy-Nagy’s work. The exhibition is accompanied by an extensive supporting programme and is accessible for the blind and visually impaired and for wheelchair users. </p><p>Exhibition opening on Tuesday, 7th October 2014, 7pm</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/sensing-the-future-laszlo-moholy-nagy-the-media-and-the-arts#comments Bauhaus Faces Berlin Exhibition Wed, 01 Oct 2014 13:17:46 +0000 Bauhaus-Archiv/Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin 8721 at http://bauhaus-online.de Etel Mittag-Fodor: A Life between Worlds http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/etel-mittag-fodor-a-life-between-worlds <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/etel-mittag-fodor-a-life-between-worlds" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/s.11_spezial.jpg" alt="" title="Etel Mittag-Fodor, Sprung von der Terrasse der Bauhauskantine, ca. 1930" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="322" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/etel-mittag-fodor-a-life-between-worlds"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/en/atlas/personen/etel-fodor-mittag" title="Etel Fodor-Mittag">Etel Mittag-Fodor</a> (1905–2005) is among those Bauhaus students whose photographs are still largely unknown – despite the fact that these very high-quality works evoke a great deal about the spirit of her times and her very individual sense of humour in both their composition and their visual language. The project of publishing the work of Mittag-Fodor and her virtually exemplary biography as an exile is of special importance to the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin.</p><p>Etel came to the Bauhaus Dessau in <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1928" title="1928">1928</a>, following her training as a graphic artist. After completing the <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/lehre/Vorkurs-josef-albers" title="Preliminary Course by Josef Albers">preliminary course</a> of <a href="/en/atlas/personen/josef-albers" title="Josef Albers">Josef Albers</a>, she entered the printing and <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/werkstaetten/druck-reklame-werkstatt" title="Printing and Advertising Workshop">advertising workshop</a> and, from <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1929" title="1929">1929</a> onwards, attended<a href="/en/atlas/personen/walter-peterhans" title="Walter Peterhans"> Walter Peterhans</a>’s photo class. By <a href="/en/atlas/jahre/1930" title="1930">1930</a>, when she left the Bauhaus to establish herself as a photographer in Berlin, she had created numerous still lifes and portraits. In the years that followed, the stations of her life led through Budapest to a stay in Moscow and finally to her emigration to South Africa, where she continued to work as a photographer and weaver to a very advanced age, fully in keeping with her motto: ‘I absolutely wanted to make something of my life.’</p><p>On the occasion of the European Photography Month, the Bauhaus-Archiv in Berlin is presenting a studio exhibition from 23.10. until 24.11.2014 with selected photographs by Bauhaus member Etel Mittag-Fodor (1905–2005). With her still lifes and portraits, she is one of the Bauhaus’s most important photographers. To coincide with the exhibition, her memoirs with commentary are being published for the first time, as the third volume in the series "Bauhaus Members: Documents from the Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin".</p><p>More information at <a href="http://www.mdf-berlin.de/en/">www.mdf-berlin.de</a></p><p><strong>Etel Mittag-Fodor, "Not an Unusual Life, for the Time and Place", ed. by Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin (Bauhäusler.Dokumente aus dem Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Bd. 3), Berlin 2014, ca. 14 €.</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/etel-mittag-fodor-a-life-between-worlds#comments Bauhaus Faces Berlin Exhibition Fri, 26 Sep 2014 16:41:47 +0000 Bauhaus-Archiv/Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin 8706 at http://bauhaus-online.de Daughter of Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius has died http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/daughter-of-bauhaus-founder-walter-gropius-has-died <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>On 7 September 2014, Ati Gropius Johansen died near Boston, at the age of 88. The daughter of Bauhaus founder <a href="/en/atlas/personen/walter-gropius" title="Walter Gropius">Walter Gropius</a>, she emigrated to the USA together with her parents in 1937. Educated in the Bauhaus tradition at Black Mountain College and at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, she became a successful illustrator and was constantly committed to preserving the legacy of the Bauhaus. Her support for the <a href="http://www.bauhaus.de">Bauhaus-Archiv</a>, co-founded by Walter Gropius in 1960, continued to the end of her life. She taught the Bauhaus <a href="/en/atlas/das-bauhaus/lehre/Vorkurs-josef-albers" title="Preliminary Course by Josef Albers">preliminary course</a>, based on <a href="/en/atlas/personen/josef-albers" title="Josef Albers">Josef Albers’</a>s course, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, at the Walter Gropius School in Erfurt and elsewhere."</p><p></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/daughter-of-bauhaus-founder-walter-gropius-has-died" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/ati_gropius_johansen_foto__annemarie_jaeggi_mai_2013_copyright_bauhaus-archiv_berlin.jpg" alt="" title="Ati Gropius Johansen in May 2013 Photo: Annemarie Jaeggi Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="326" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/daughter-of-bauhaus-founder-walter-gropius-has-died"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"We are saddened by the death of Ati Gropius Johansen. The Bauhaus-Archiv has lost a major supporter, who enriched our work to an extraordinary extent," said Dr. Annemarie Jaeggi, Director of the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, on Monday. "I am extremely grateful that Ati showed such generous and active commitment to our institution and became a close friend for us. We shall miss her."</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/daughter-of-bauhaus-founder-walter-gropius-has-died#comments Bauhaus Faces Berlin Wed, 17 Sep 2014 20:54:53 +0000 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin 8698 at http://bauhaus-online.de The way for the competition process in Dessau is cleared http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/nachricht/the-way-for-the-competition-process-in-dessau-is-cleared <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Foundation Board of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation has once again confirmed at today's special meeting the intention to erect the new building of the Bauhaus Museum at City Park. Furthermore, the Foundation Board decided about the exhibition and communication concept for the Bauhaus Museum as a basis for further proceedings. In addition, the committee agreed on the further competition process and instructed the Director to apply, by secured total funding, for an open two-phase competition of the new building project. The Foundation Board recommended nine professionals for the Advisory Board of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation (among others Ute Eskildsen - Professor of Photography in Essen, Daniel Hug - Director of the Art Cologne, and Prof. Dr. Martino Stierli - Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at MoMA in New York).</p> </div> </div> </div> Architecture Bauhaus 2019 Dessau Thu, 11 Sep 2014 12:11:14 +0000 Redaktion bauhaus-online.de 8696 at http://bauhaus-online.de Bauhaus City Dessau http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-city-dessau-0 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When the Bauhaus arrived in Dessau in <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1925">1925</a> the ambition of giving shape to society became reality. The political, economic and cultural urban elites had brought the School of Design to the city in order to forge the future of the up-and-coming municipality in the spirit of modernism. The Bauhaus not only made its mark on the architecture of the city, but also contributed to the design of many municipal facilities, from city information office to library, from theatre to swimming pool. In the new Bauhaus book “Die unsichtbare Bauhausstadt. Eine Spurensuche in Dessau” (The invisible Bauhaus City. Searching for traces in Dessau), author Andreas Butter explores how a modernist network took shape in the city.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-city-dessau-0" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/bauhaus_tb09_bauhausorte_titel.jpg" alt="" title="Buch cover &quot;Bauhausstadt Dessau – Labor der Moderne&quot;" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="316" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-city-dessau-0"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Nowadays, the idea of the “Bauhaus City” should inspire confidence and a sense of direction – but how did things look at the time? In 1925, when Lord Mayor Fritz Hesse brought the School of Design from Weimar to the ambitious industrial town, its housing concept delighted social reformers and intimidated conservatives. In various ways, the work of the masters and students had an effect on the destinies of the city’s inhabitants: besides Junkers, around 100 companies worked together with the institute. The worlds of art and academia set out on the path to modernism, with the Garden Realm of the Enlightenment’s Prince Franz serving as a role model and emblems of the new age making their mark in numerous locations. Nevertheless, after seven years in which the prevailing conflicts had become politicised, ill will won out. But even the NSDAP’s Sturmabteilung and the Public Prosecutor’s office were unable to bring about the school’s final demise, and the Bauhaus is now more celebrated than ever.</p><p>Based on various Bauhaus sites in Dessau, the book relates how the history of the city and the School of Design were closely interwoven. The hidden origins of this connection are addressed in a 32-page picture section with artistic photographs from present-day Dessau.</p><p>Bauhaus Dessau Foundation (Ed.): “Bauhausstadt Dessau – Labor der Moderne” (Bauhaus City Dessau – Workshop of Modernism), with texts by Andreas Butter and images by Daniel Niggemann, ca. 190 pages incl. 32-page picture section, Spector Books, Leipzig 2013, € 9,90</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-city-dessau-0#comments Architecture Dessau Publication Thu, 04 Sep 2014 17:54:18 +0000 Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau 8691 at http://bauhaus-online.de Bauhaus Face: Wassily Kandinsky http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-wassily-kandinsky <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Russian painter and cosmopolitan <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky</a> taught at the Bauhaus from <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1922">1922</a> to <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1933">1933</a>, having already gained a reputation as a theorist and practitioner of abstract art owing among other things to his book “Concerning the Spiritual in Art” (1912), the almanac “Der Blaue Reiter” (1912) and several exhibitions. He was already living in Germany before he began to work at the Bauhaus, teaching from 1901 to 1902 in Munich at the private art school Phalanx before returning to Russia in 1914. In Moscow he taught from 1918 to 1921 at SOMAS (the Free State Art Studio), the Institute of Artistic Culture INKHuK and the art school VKHuTEMAS. He was appointed to teach at the Bauhaus by its founder <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/walter-gropius">Walter Gropius</a>. Up to the school’s eventual closure, Kandinsky remained active at the Bauhaus under its subsequent directors <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/hannes-meyer">Hannes Meyer</a> and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/ludwig-mies-van-der-rohe">Ludwig Mies van der Rohe</a> and despite the school’s relocation from Weimar to Dessau (1925) and from there to Berlin (1932).</p><p>During his time at the Bauhaus, Kandinsky taught a variety of courses, published books including a development of his art theory in “Point and Line to Plane” (1926) in the series of Bauhaus books, and produced around 350 oil paintings and a total of 584 watercolour, gouache and tempera paintings. As in his own works from this period, the elementary geometric forms and colours also played an important role in <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/das-bauhaus/lehre/unterricht-wassily-kandinsky">Kandinsky’s classes</a>. As master of form in thewall painting workshop, of which he was head from 1922 to 1925, Kandinsky put to the test his theories regarding the coherencies between the elementary colours of yellow, red and blue and the elementary forms of triangle, square and circle, based on a questionnaire, which was to be filled in by his students.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-wassily-kandinsky" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/1_portraetfoto_von_kandinsky_fotograf_hugo_erfurth.jpg" alt="" title="Hugo Erfurth, Porträt Wassily Kandinsky, 1925-1928 Bauhaus‐Archiv Berlin" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="318" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-wassily-kandinsky"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>His classes for the introductory course, later known as the preliminary course, were obligatory for all new students from <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1922">1922</a> to <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1930">1930</a>. Initially lasting one term, then two terms from 1925, this featured lessons in both analytical drawing and design theory. Together, the courses were designed to give students the capacity to perceive and interpret colour, form and abstraction as a basis for an autonomous, synthesized design, coupled with an understanding of abstract art as an evolutionary step in art and the history of the human race. In fourteen lecture modules, Kandinsky first addressed art history, then explored the colours yellow and blue, red, white and black, green and grey, orange and violet, and subsequently focused on point, line and plane and their relationships to colour. The lectures were complemented by practical courses for students, group critiques of the outcomes and homework. Kandinsky taught that art was governed by rules, the grammar of which could be learned, even though he also invariably emphasised that art was not possible without intuition. His class in analytical drawing, in which the students for instance set up and connected still life compositions with linear networks and abstracted these based on the elementary forms of circle, square, triangle and rhombus, was part of the design-orientated schooling at the Bauhaus.</p><p>In the course of the increasingly functional orientation of the Bauhaus under <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/hannes-meyer">Hannes Meyer</a>, in 1928 Kandinsky taught an intensive seminar in construction and design for students pursuing their main studies. In fourteen lectures, he compared technology with art, discussed form and content and focused explicitly on construction. In doing so, he made use of a wide range of images from the worlds of art, architecture, technology, daily life in different cultures and flora and fauna.</p><p>In addition, Kandinsky taught a painting class from 1927, which from 1928 was referred to as a “free painting class”. However, this was not a painting class per se; rather, the students’ work was discussed in terms of colour, rhythm, tensions and composition. While Kandinsky’s classes were developed as additional options for the students under Hannes Meyer, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/ludwig-mies-van-der-rohe">Ludwig Mies van der Rohe</a> consistently cut down on Kandinsky’s lessons and made them a voluntary part of the students’ curriculum. In Berlin, Kandinsky’s teaching was limited to the “free painting class”, which nevertheless remained popular with the students until the closure of the Bauhaus in 1933. Following his departure from the Bauhaus, Kandinsky moved to Paris in 1933, where he died in 1944.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Biography</strong></p><p>Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944)</p><p><strong>4.12.1866</strong> Birth in Moscow</p><p><strong>1885-1893 </strong>Studies law, economics and statistics at the University of Moscow, marries Anja Fedorovna Chimyakina</p><p><strong>1896</strong> Moves to Munich</p><p><strong>1897-1901</strong> Attends the private painting school of Anton Ažbe and is accepted in Franz von Stuck’s painting class; meets <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/paul-klee">Paul Klee</a></p><p><strong>1901-02 </strong>Foundation of the exhibition association and private art school Phalanx, classes in painting and life drawing</p><p><strong>1904-1908 </strong>Travels with Gabriele Münter to Holland, France, Tunisia, Itally and Switzerland</p><p><strong>1911-1912 </strong>Publication of the book “Concerning the Spiritual in Art” and the almanac “Der Blaue Reiter” (in collaboration with Franz Marc)</p><p><strong>1914-1921 </strong>Returns to Moscow, marries Nina Nikolayevna Andreevskaya, works with several Russian arts and cultural institutions (inc. NARKOMPROS, INKHuK)</p><p><strong>1921 </strong>Leaves for Berlin</p><p><strong>1922</strong> Begins to teach at the Bauhaus in Weimar, design of wall paintings for the Juryfreie Kunstschau, Berlin</p><p><strong>1923-24</strong> Acquaintance with the art historian Will Grohmann, publication of Grohmann’s first Kandinsky monograph</p><p><strong>1924</strong> Foundation of the exhibition group “Die Blaue Vier” with <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/lyonel-feininger">Lyonel Feininger</a>, Alexej von Jawlensky and Paul Klee</p><p><strong>1925</strong> Relocates with the Bauhaus to Dessau, moves into one of the Master’s Houses</p><p><strong>1926</strong> Publication of the Bauhaus book “Point and Line to Plane”, exhibition to commemorate his sixtieth birthday</p><p><strong>1928</strong> Set design for Modest Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition” at the Stadttheater, Dessau</p><p><strong>1931</strong> Ceramic wall design for a music room at the Deutsche Bauausstellung in Berlin</p><p><strong>1932</strong> Relocates with the Bauhaus to Berlin</p><p><strong>1933</strong> Closure of the Bauhaus and relocation to Paris</p><p><strong>1937</strong> 57 works by Kandinsky are seized from German museums, 14 works shown at the propaganda exhibition “Entartete Kunst” (Degenerate art)</p><p><strong>13.12.1944</strong> Death in Paris</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-face-wassily-kandinsky#comments Bauhaus Faces Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:11:11 +0000 8690 at http://bauhaus-online.de The architect of the new Weimar Bauhaus Museum http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-architect-of-the-new-weimar-bauhaus-museum <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Study of architecture in Berlin, DAAD (GAES) research fellowship in Tokyo, research assistant at Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, foundation of a practice in Berlin, professor at Fachhochschule Potsdam, two children: Heike Handa’s career speaks for itself. Working together with Prof. Benedict Tonon, last year she ourperformed 536 participants to win the international competition for the new Bauhaus Museum building in Weimar. Heike Hanada in conversation with Gabriela Oroz.</p><p><strong>At the moment, your work often takes you to Weimar. Do you remember the first time you came to the city? What impressions do you recall?</strong></p><p>For me, Weimar was never an unknown quantity because my grandmother comes from Thuringia. Although my parents moved to the west before the Berlin Wall was built, we visited Thuringia every summer and also frequently travelled to Weimar. Even in those days, the Ilmpark with its lovely, romantic and charming landscape was what impressed me the most. The second decisive moment for me in Weimar came in the summer of 1999, when I met Prof. Karl-Heinz Schmitz for an interview at the faculty of design and building studies II at Bauhaus-Universität Weimar. That year, Weimar was the European Capital of Culture, and a thrilling place to be. My conversations with the students were often fascinating and exciting, because many of them had grown up in the GDR. Working in Prof. Karl-Heinz Schmitz’s department is still the most formative experience that I’ve had. Then, in 2012, the faculty of architecture asked me to be a member of the jury for the graduation exhibition. I was very pleased about this “return” to my former place of work.</p><p><strong>From Weimar you then went straight to Berlin, where you set up your own office. How did your first steps into self-employment go?</strong></p><p>While I was at the university I made a conscious decision not to set up my own office, because I thought the pressures of the demanding job there combined with my family would be too much. When I stopped working at the university in 2006, setting up my own office was more of a stopgap. I was unemployed and took a seminar on setting up a business with the only project that was on the table: a highly adventurous competition entry for an extension to the municipal library in Stockholm. To my mind, it’s still a small miracle: to win first place with my first competition, which allowed me to set up my own business. The project gained a lot of attention in the press, although it was not realised for a number of reasons. That made it easier for me to take part in other projects and competition. I still run my office on my own, but I work with other architects on specific projects.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-architect-of-the-new-weimar-bauhaus-museum" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/interview_hanada_portraet_copyright_heike_hanada.jpg" alt="" title="Portrait of Heike Hanada" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="291" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/the-architect-of-the-new-weimar-bauhaus-museum"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>You did so for the competition entry for the Bauhaus Museum. How did your collaboration with Benedict Tonon come about? How do you divide your workload?</strong></p><p>I first began on my own, working on the concept. I knew Benedict Tonon from before, when I worked in his office in the 1980s. And after working successfully together on a competition project in Potsdam I spoke to him about the competition for the Bauhaus Museum. We had a clear division of labour from the start. Benedict Tonon’s strengths, which I value highly, lie in concept development and urban development. Because we are both strong designers, we always set out a 60 per cent vote in advance, so that we avoid endless discussions. Benedict Tonon lends conceptual support for the Bauhaus Museum project, but most of the work happens in my office.</p><p><strong>What convinced you to participate in the competition for the Bauhaus Museum?</strong></p><p>I participate in around two or three competitions per year. The first question is invariably whether we’re allowed to participate, because open competitions are a rarity these days. And then it comes down to the context. I look specifically for themes that interest me. The competition for the Bauhaus Museum was one of the major open competitions of 2011. It interested me to think about how we look at modernism, what relationship I have to it, and how this relationship might be reflected in the building itself. This is a critical question, irrespective of whether one has lived in Weimar or not.</p><p><strong>The decision in favour of your design was made in summer 2012. At what stage in its realisation are you now?</strong></p><p>In summer 2012, the municipality of Weimar also decided to issue a development plan for the grounds of the Bauhaus Museum. The development plan provides security that my design will actually be realised. The municipality and Klassik Stiftung Weimar are currently focusing above all else on establishing the foundations for the development plan. At the same time, Klassik Stiftung Weimar has commissioned me, based on my competition entry, to complete the design documentation for the Museum by spring 2014.</p><p><strong>Do you see architects as role models?</strong></p><p>There are many architects, whom I find influential. Peter Zumthor, for example, has successfully built high quality and sustainable architecture. When I was studying in Berlin in the 1980s, it was plain to see how architecture was suffering. To my mind, the change came in the 1990s with the Swiss architects. Apart from a number of contemporary architects, classical modern architects such as <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/ludwig-mies-van-der-rohe">Mies van der Rohe</a> and Louis Kahn appeal to me. I am also often drawn to independently-minded architects, such as Álvaro Siza. The list could go on and on. In any case, I try to look at major works of architecture with an eye to where their strengths lie and what I can learn from that.</p><p><strong>What message would you have for today’s students of architecture?</strong></p><p>I don’t believe that it’s important to become self-employed as quickly as possible. To want to be one’s own boss is understandable, but I think that these years of learning, which one needs in order to reach a certain level of maturity, are really important. Today, this step seems to be taken too fast, which means that one lacks foresight. Often, the point where one wishes to be is found by chance, rather than by design, and in the process a certain objective can be missed. I would advise today’s students to give themselves time find their feet, work in a good office for a some time, all the while keeping their own career in view.</p><p><strong>Many thanks for your time and the insights into your work!</strong></p><p>The interview appeared in <a href="http://www.uni-weimar.de/de/universitaet/aktuell/bauhausjournal-online/">Bauhaus.Journal 2012/2013</a>, published by Bauhaus-Universität Weimar.</p><p>Facts and figures: Bauhaus Museum Weimar</p><p>Location: Platz am Weimarhallenpark, total floor space: 3,716 m2</p><p>Investment volume: 22.6 million euros from the special investment programme of the German federal government and the State of Thuringia.</p><p>Museum collection: Currently ca. 10,000 exhibits on the background, history and lasting influence of the Staatliches Bauhaus</p><p>Further information: <a href="http://www.bauhausmuseumweimar.de/">www.bauhausmuseumweimar.de</a></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/the-architect-of-the-new-weimar-bauhaus-museum#comments Architecture Interview Weimar Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:05:04 +0000 Gabriela Oroz 8689 at http://bauhaus-online.de Bauhaus Cooperation Berlin Dessau Weimar welcomes statements in coalition agreement http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-cooperation-berlin-dessau-weimar-welcomes-statements <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“The coalition agreement’s acknowledgement of the Bauhaus centenary year 2019 ‘as an event of national and international significance’ is a great success for the Bauhaus cooperation and a validation of our long-term efforts”, states Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Holler, General Director of the <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/klassik-stiftung-weimar">Klassik Stiftung Weimar</a> museums and this year’s executive director of the Bauhaus Cooperation. “Together with our partners at the <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/bauhaus-archiv-berlin">Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin</a> and the <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/stiftung-bauhaus-dessau">Bauhaus Dessau</a> Foundationwe can now intensify our work as regards content. It gives us great confidence that the coalition partners acknowledged the need to strengthen the museum and architectural infrastructure at all three locations”, continued Holler.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-cooperation-berlin-dessau-weimar-welcomes-statements"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In 2012, six federal states (Baden-Wuerttemberg, Berlin, Brandenburg, Lower Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia) came together to form the associationBauhaus 2019with a view to making the Bauhaus centenary a national event with an international impact. In July 2013 the association’s board of trustees met in Weimar and reached agreement on the structure, objectives and project ideas for the centenary year 2019. The activities for the anniversary will have the overarching theme “Die Welt neu Denken” (Rethinking the world) – an ambition of the historic Bauhaus that encompasses the further development of the Bauhaus’s ideas. The stated objective is that the subject of the Bauhaus is not laid to rest with the centenary year, but that the numerous events in fact generate momentum for the time thereafter. The main event will be a centenary exhibition, held at the three historic Bauhaus locations in Weimar, Dessau and Berlin.</p><p>The coalition agreement states that: “The Bauhaus centenary in 2019 will also be supported by the German federal government as an event of national and international significance. We will establish the necessary structural conditions at the three Bauhaus institutions Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/klassik-stiftung-weimar">Klassik Stiftung Weimar</a> and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/bauhaus-archiv-berlin">Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin</a>. Together with the federal states united in the associationBauhaus 2019, the German federal government will contribute to the preparations for the Bauhaus centenary.” (‘Deutschlands Zukunft gestalten’ (Shaping Germany’s future), coalition agreement between the CDU, CSU and SPD, 18th legislative period, p.132)</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/bauhaus-cooperation-berlin-dessau-weimar-welcomes-statements#comments Bauhaus 2019 Berlin Dessau Weimar Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:01:10 +0000 Timm Schulze 8688 at http://bauhaus-online.de A friendship that evolved from a crisis http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/a-friendship-that-evolved-from-a-crisis <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/a-friendship-that-evolved-from-a-crisis"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>On the night of 21 to 22 June 1943, having been bombed out and temporarily blinded, Georg Muche sits surrounded by his possessions on the Ostwall in Krefeld and meets the textile industrialist Hans Jammers. Jammers invites Muche and his wife El to move in to his family home on Bismarckstrasse 80. The desperate situation results in a close friendship that would last until Jammers’s death in 1974. Muche, a former Bauhaus master, moves to Krefeld in 1939 to take up a post as creative director of the masters class for textile art (which he had founded) at the textile engineering school, after having been dismissed without notice from the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Breslau by the National Socialists in 1933. During this period, he already gets to know Jammers, who works closely with the textile engineering school as the owner of the family firm “Mechanische Seidenweberei Carl Jammers KG”. Muche stays in Krefeld until 1958 and moves to Lake Constance in 1960. Over the years, the painter and textile industrialist exchanged over 240 letters. These letters have now been bequeathed to the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, where they augment the archival collection.</p><p>Literature:</p><p>Jens Voss, “Erinnerung an eine große Freundschaft” (Memories of a great friendship), in: Rheinische Post, 30 July 2014</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/a-friendship-that-evolved-from-a-crisis#comments Bauhaus Faces Dessau Research Sat, 16 Aug 2014 17:32:53 +0000 Anja Guttenberger 8684 at http://bauhaus-online.de New Master’s Houses in Dessau http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/new-master%E2%80%99s-houses-in-dessau <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When the Bauhaus moved from Weimar to Dessau in <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1925">1925</a> Lord Mayor Fritz Hesse promised the founder of the Bauhaus, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/walter-gropius">Walter Gropius</a>, the necessary financing not only for a new school building, but also for a residential complex for the Bauhaus’s teachers, known as masters since the Weimar days. Just a year later the Bauhaus building and the Master’s Houses were finished and became symbols of a revolution in design and education. To this day, they are the epitome of “white modernism“ worldwide.</p><p>The complex of Master’s Houses is one of the most impressive examples of Bauhaus modernism in Germany, and became a byword for the twentieth century artists’ colony. Pioneering works of classical modernist art were created in the cubic homes and ateliers. The complex was moreover seen as a kind of experimental workshop for the Bauhaus idea of a new way of living. With <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/walter-gropius">Walter Gropius</a>, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/hannes-meyer">Hannes Meyer </a>and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/ludwig-mies-van-der-rohe">Ludwig Mies van der Rohe</a>, all three directors of the Bauhaus lived right next to Bauhaus masters <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/laszlo-moholy-nagy">László Moholy-Nagy,</a> <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/lyonel-feininger">Lyonel Feininger</a>, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/georg-muche">Georg Muche</a>, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer,</a> <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/wassily-kandinsky">Wassily Kandinsky</a> and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/paul-klee">Paul Klee</a>. Later, they were joined by Anni and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/josef-albers">Josef Albers</a>, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/gertrud-arndt-hantschk">Gertrud</a> and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/alfred-arndt">Alfred Arndt</a>, <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/gunta-stoelzl">Gunta Stölzl</a> and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/lou-scheper-berkenkamp">Lou</a> and <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/hinnerk-scheper">Hinnerk Scheper</a>.</p><p>With the collapse of the Weimar Republic – the end of the first democracy on German soil – the Bauhaus masters and students left their place of work in Dessau. After a short period in Berlin, the Bauhaus succumbed to the pressures exerted by the National Socialists and closed in <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/jahre/1933">1933</a>. Many of the Bauhauslers had to emigrate and were never to return to Germany. The Nazis saw the now empty Master’s Houses as “un-German” and had them redeveloped. When Dessau was bombed in 1945, Gropius House and the Moholy-Nagy half of a Masters’ House were also reduced to rubble. The remaining houses survived the GDR era as rental properties used by third parties, but no evidence remained of the original Bauhaus architecture, which had been deliberately and promptly destroyed.</p><p>With the reunification of Germany, the fortunes of the complex changed. Thanks to financially strong investors, the municipality of Dessau was in a position to renovate the surviving Feininger, Kandinsky/Klee and Muche/Schlemmer houses in 1994, 2000 and 2001 respectively. The complex of Master’s Houses recovered its identity, but remained nonetheless incomplete. For a number of years there was a controversial debate about whether and how the destroyed houses might be rebuilt. The turning point came in 2001: In consultation with the leading British architect David Chipperfield and other experts, a decision was made to rebuild the Gropius and Moholy-Nagy Master’s Houses, not as replicas of the originals, but utilising the means of contemporary architecture. As a result, they have now been rebuilt as innovative reductions and abstractions of the original buildings. Inside the buildings, artist Olaf Nicolai has created an installation that re-enacts the original dialogue between Gropius’s architecture and the Bauhaus artists. Instead of colour, light! The kiosk designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, which protrudes from the wall surrounding the complex, is also back in its original place.</p><p>The reparation of the complex of Master’s Houses is a project of the municipality of Dessau-Roßlau, supported and supervised by the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation in the framework of their mission to conserve the legacy of the Bauhaus.</p><p>The topping-out ceremony for the rebuild of Gropius House was held in December 2012; the opening took place on 16 May 2014.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/new-master%E2%80%99s-houses-in-dessau" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/neue_meisterhnuser-7561.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="285" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/new-master%E2%80%99s-houses-in-dessau"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Architects Bruno Fioretti Marquez built the new Gropius and Moholy-Nagy Master’s Houses</strong></p><p>In actual fact, we know the Director’s House and the Moholy-Nagy House only from historical documents: drawings, plans, models and photos. In spring 2010 the Berlin-based architects Bruno Fioretti Marquez delivered a convincing concept that comes to grips with memories. Rather than reconstruct the Bauhaus icons, they prioritised an interpretation, utilising the means of contemporary architecture.</p><p>For the architects, who come from Italy and Argentina, reconstruction was not an option, because it would have not only obscured the differences of the architectural origins, but also would – like every copy – query the legitimacy of the originals. The concept of imprecision as an inevitable component of memory was elevated to an architectonic principle. Their design aims to meet the requirement of repair by recreating the shell of the earlier buildings. The visitor will recognise all this in the choice of materials and the drastic reduction of details.</p><p>A shell of poured concrete with embedded windows surrounds a sculptural “artefact” that gives a fragmented rendition of the original internal organisation of the buildings. This reduction of the building to two elements allows for multilayered interpretations. It is to be understood as an incentive to complete the picture of the building in one’s own mind and, at the same time, creates an independent composition, a tension between solid shell and subtle installation.</p><p><strong>On Olaf Nicolai’s artistic interior configuration of the new Master’s Houses in Dessau</strong></p><p>The dialectic of tradition and renewal inherent to the work of architects Bruno Fioretti Marquez is also taken up in the work “La pigment de lumière” (The colour of light) by the artist Olaf Nicolai, who designed the so-called artefacts inside the new Master’s Houses. One of Germany’s most successful artists on the international scene, Nicolai divides the structure into different segments, thereby creating an abstract image composed of rectangles and squares.</p><p>The “grid” of the given structure forms the starting point; segments within this are defined, thus establishing a composition that brings to mind a constructive-abstract image made up of rectangles and squares of different sizes, these to be enhanced by occasional diagonal connections.</p><p>This arrangement is no arbitrary projection; it is dictated by the structural specifications of the building. These lines define segments, which, however, are not defined by colour, ornamentation or structures; rather, it is the surface itself which is worked by hand to create a diverse range of render and spackle finishes. That is to say: the visual segmentation and the technical realisation evolve from the building and the conditions of its realisation. Each segment is given its own surface, which, thanks to the incident light and the depth of the room, yields an extremely subtle interplay of monochrome surfaces.</p><p>The artefacts gain a “skin” that accentuates them clearly, yet does not dominate in and of itself. Rendered and spackled surfaces take on a variety of guises.  The alternation of the white surfaces, the boundaries of which blend from one to the next, and the different angles of refraction that the differently finished surfaces present, create a subtle interplay of refraction and shadow effects. Nicolai developed his work based on the theories of László Moholy-Nagy, who dealt intensively with the phenomenon of light and its pigments. “La pigment de lumière” was generously supported by the Kunststiftung Sachsen-Anhalt, Stiftung Meisterhäuser Dessau and Lotto-Toto GmbH Sachsen-Anhalt.</p><p></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/new-master%E2%80%99s-houses-in-dessau#comments Dessau Fri, 01 Aug 2014 09:35:29 +0000 Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau 8683 at http://bauhaus-online.de As Bauhauslers we are seekers http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/as-bauhauslers-we-are-seekers <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>After a long break, the series of publications by the association “baudenkmal bundesschule bernau e.V.” continues with journal no. 7, entitled ‘“als bauhäusler sind wir suchende” Hannes Meyer (1889 – 1954) Beiträge zu seinem Leben und Wirken’ (“as bauhauslers we are seekers” Hannes Meyer (1889-1954) Articles on his life and work). The journal is published to coincide with the 125th birthday of <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/hannes-meyer">Hannes Meyer</a> in 2014. The association was especially keen to commemorate the Bauhaus and Hannes Meyer researcher Klaus-Jürgen Winkler (1944-2011), to whom this journal is dedicated.</p><p>On almost 100 pages the authors explore different aspects of Hannes Meyer’s life and work in Switzerland, Germany, Russia and Mexico. One article focuses on his intermittent collaborator <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/hans-wittwer">Hans Wittwer</a>. The articles are accompanied by an index of names.</p><p><strong>This book has not yet been translated into English and is available only in German.</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/as-bauhauslers-we-are-seekers" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/leseprobe_heft_7_schriftenreihe_bbb_0.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="307" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/as-bauhauslers-we-are-seekers"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Journal no. 7 – List of contents</strong></p><p>Introduction – Michael Siebenbrodt p. 4</p><p>Hans Wittwer - a cooperative individualist – Hans-Jakob Wittwer pp. 5-9</p><p>Hannes Meyer and the Duncker family. An attempt to reconstruct their amicable encounters – Heinz Deutschland pp. 10-18</p><p>Hannes Meyer in private. “Life is a pursuit of oxygen + carbon + sugar + starch + protein.” – Anja Guttenberger pp. 19-25</p><p>“ein eisenbahnwaggon ausstellungsgut”. The Bauhaus-Wanderaustellung 1929/30 and its show in Mannheim Christoph Zuschlag pp. 26 - 34</p><p>The Bauhaus Director Hannes Meyer as university lecturer and architect in Moscow 1930-1936 – Michael Siebenbrodt pp. 35-40</p><p>Hannes Meyer’s strong women of the Bauhaus commune on Moscow’s Arbat-Platz 1930 – 1938 – Astrid Volpert pp. 41-54</p><p>Hannes Meyer’s cooperative children’s home Mümliswil (1939). A former orphanage boarder and Bauhaus Director builds a children’s home – Thomas Huonker pp. 55-63</p><p>A final encounter in Mexico. Tina Modotti and Hannes Meyer – Peter Steininger pp. 64-71</p><p>Hannes Meyer and the Bauhaus in Mexico in the context of transnational migration in the first half of the 20th century – Karoline Noack pp. 72-83</p><p>The Hannes-Meyer-Prize – Peter Steininger pp. 84-94</p><p>Index of names pp. 95–102</p><p>Index of illustrations p. 103</p><p>Index of authors p. 104</p><p><strong>The journal may be ordered from the association <a href="http://www.bauhaus-denkmal-bernau.de/publikationen.html">here</a> for € 5 plus shipping. It is available free to members of the association.</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/as-bauhauslers-we-are-seekers#comments Bauhaus Faces Publication Research Fri, 01 Aug 2014 09:30:36 +0000 baudenkmal bundesschule bernau 8682 at http://bauhaus-online.de Dessau 1945 – Destruction of Modernity http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/dessau-1945-destruction-of-modernity <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text-upper"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When the Gropius and Moholy-Nagy Master’s Houses were destroyed in spring 1945, Dessau, too, lay in ruins. After the National Socialists came to power, the former residential city of Anhalt became synonymous with arms production and forced labour. The name Junkers became representative of the aerial warfare in Europe and the “pesticide” Zyklon B produced in Dessau became a tragic byword for the genocide of the European Jewry. At the end of the war, the houses previously lived in by the Bauhaus masters were occupied by the executive employees of the Junkers aircraft factory. The exhibition “Dessau 1945: Destruction of Modernity” shows the Bauhaus city from the National Socialists’ assumption of power up to the end of the war.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/dessau-1945-destruction-of-modernity"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson can be described as a high-profile key witness: Having been imprisoned in Germany himself, he documented the return of French forced labourers and prisoners of war. 32 of the resulting works will now be on display in the basement of the Bauhaus building. Historic documents, maps and witness statements from Dessau’s municipal archives and the main archive of the federal state of Saxony-Anhalt will complement these. In the context of the compensation claims made by former forced labourers from 2000 to 2007, these had provided evidence of their exploitation. These ca. 40 witnesses and hitherto unpublished video interviews with witnesses are held in Dessau’s municipal archives; some of these will be made public in the scope of the exhibition. Curated by Philipp Oswalt and on show until 7 September 2014, the exhibition is the first to focus on the very duality of the legacy of modernity in Dessau.</p><p>To accompany the exhibition, the book “Dessau 1945 – Moderne Zerstört” was published by <a href="http://www.spectorbooks.com/">Spector Books</a> in the series Edition Bauhaus (No. 45) (€ 34,00), with contributions by Philipp Oswalt, Wolfgang Thöner, Ingolf Kern, Anke Blümm, Katharina Menzel-Ahr, Thomas Tode, Richard Overy and others.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/dessau-1945-destruction-of-modernity#comments Dessau Exhibition Photography Fri, 01 Aug 2014 09:26:03 +0000 Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau 8681 at http://bauhaus-online.de Man and Art Figure. Oskar Schlemmer’s intermedial programmatic http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/man-and-art-figure-oskar-schlemmer%E2%80%99s-intermedial-programmati <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/man-and-art-figure-oskar-schlemmer%E2%80%99s-intermedial-programmati" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/313baxk6yl._ss500_.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="435" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/man-and-art-figure-oskar-schlemmer%E2%80%99s-intermedial-programmati"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With his <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/magazin/artikel/das-triadische-ballett">Triadic Ballet</a> (premiered in 1922), the Stuttgart-born artist <a href="http://bauhaus-online.de/atlas/personen/oskar-schlemmer">Oskar Schlemmer</a> created an exceptionally complex work that is now, along with the painting “Bauhaustreppe” (1932), one of the best-known works of classical modernism. Moving beyond mainstream art, which Schlemmer had already interpreted as that dead end in which contemporary art appears to be trapped, he pursued undeterred the opposite direction of a timeless and universal “grand style” that can only emerge from a serendipitous combination of tradition and innovation. Based on the Triadic Ballet, he developed a three-step design principle, which from then on was to define all his work. This study presents in the first instance a coherent overview of Schlemmer’s oeuvre. It does not focus, as is usually the case, on art history or theatre studies, but connects both fields of research and includes both musicological studies and aspects of literary history. This new, broad perspective demonstrates that Schlemmer must be considered a style reformer far surpassing the contemporary art revolution, whose agenda has again become hugely relevant, especially to the contemporary practice of art.</p><p>384 pages, Rombach Verlag KG; 2nd edition, revised (11 April 2014), ISBN-10: 3793097676, ISBN-13: 978-3793097679, € 64,00</p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/man-and-art-figure-oskar-schlemmer%E2%80%99s-intermedial-programmati#comments Bauhaus Faces Publication Research Fri, 01 Aug 2014 09:22:58 +0000 8680 at http://bauhaus-online.de “Bürgerinfo Bauhaus” website goes online for the people of Weimar http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/nachricht/buergerinfo-bauhaus%E2%80%9D-website-goes-online-for-the-people-of-w <div class="field field-type-text field-field-news-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Weimar gains a new Bauhaus Museum. For the people of Weimar, the realisation of such a building project raises many questions and reservations. The website "<a href="http://www.buergerinfo-bauhaus.de/">Bürgerinfo Bauhaus</a>", designed specifically to address these issues and in association with the building project, is therefore now live online. It supplies information relating to the building project and is also designed as a platform for exchange so that people of Weimar can contact those in charge and air their views in public. A <a href="https://www.facebook.com/buergerinfo.bauhaus">Facebook</a> page will also be published.</p> </div> </div> </div> Architecture Bauhaus 2019 Publikcation Weimar Fri, 01 Aug 2014 09:16:21 +0000 Redaktion bauhaus-online.de 8679 at http://bauhaus-online.de Claudia Perren is the new director of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/claudia-perren-is-the-new-director-of-the-bauhaus-dessau-fou <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-extrabild"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/claudia-perren-is-the-new-director-of-the-bauhaus-dessau-fou" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full imagecache-linked imagecache-article_full_linked"><img src="http://bauhaus-online.de/files/imagecache/article_full/magazin-bilder/portrait_claudia_perren_14_04_img_3681s.jpg" alt="" title="Portrait Dr. Claudia Perren" class="imagecache imagecache-article_full" width="290" height="435" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-article-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/en/magazin/artikel/claudia-perren-is-the-new-director-of-the-bauhaus-dessau-fou"></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-article-text"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Dr. Claudia Perren will commence her role as the new director and chief executive officer of the <a href="http://www.bauhaus-dessau.de">Bauhaus Dessau Foundation</a> on 1st August, 2014.</p><p>Dr. Claudia Perren (1973) is an architect, curator and academic, currently lecturing at the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, in design, curatorial practice, history and theory of art and architecture. Her areas of interest mainly centre on the intersection of art, design and architecture. The results of her research, teaching and practice have been published and exhibited internationally in Australia, Germany, The Netherlands, Poland, The Czech Republic, Singapore, Spain, Finland, Estonia and Switzerland. </p> </div> </div> </div> http://bauhaus-online.de/en/magazin/artikel/claudia-perren-is-the-new-director-of-the-bauhaus-dessau-fou#comments Dessau Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:58:18 +0000 Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau 8678 at http://bauhaus-online.de